This is part 2 of a 2 part post; with the video from the case previously discussed

please note the following in the video:

  • body lean to left during left stance phase (to clear right longer leg)
  • circumduction of right lower extremity  (to clear right longer leg)
  • lack of arm swing bilaterally (cortical involvement)
  • patient looking down while walking (decomposition of gait)
  • shortened step length (decomposition of gait)
  • increased tibial varum bilaterally

ASSESSMENT:  This patient’s short leg and internal tibial torsion impediments to her full recovery. She has increased tibial varum noted which is complicating the picture. This is causing pathomechanics and an abductory moment not only at the knee but also in the lumbar, thoracic and cervical spines.

WHAT DID WE DO?:                    

  • We attempted to do the one leg standing exercise. She needed to hold on and did not feel stable on the left hip while performing this.  This is probably more of confidence rather than ability issue. 
  • We gave her the stand/sit exercise to try to improve gluteal recruitment.
  • We also gave her the lift/spread/reach exercise to attempt to strengthen her feet.
  • A full-length 5 mm lift was cut for the left shoe  She felt more stable when walking on this.
  • She was treated with IC, PIR and manipulative therapy and neuromuscular stim of the knee as well as left hip area above, below and at the joint line of the knee as well as gluteus medius and minimus.   
  • We may need to consider building a more aggressive orthotic with a forefoot varus post depending upon her progress and response to care  

 The Gait Guys. Making it real, each and every post here on the blog.

special thanks to SZ for allowing us to publish her case, so others can learn

Yes, we are all twisted: Part 1

Developmentally speaking, that is.  Version and Torsion are the words we need to know. There are 3 normal versional changes that take place in the lower extremity development from infant to adult: rotation of the talar head/neck, tibial rotation, and femoral rotation  (see above). 

So, what is the difference between a torsion and version?

A version is a normal variation in the “twistedness” of a limb (longitudinally speaking) between its proximal and distal portions, representing a normal range of development (see femur above) .  An example is the head and neck of the femur has an angle of 8-12 degrees with respect the femoral condyles.

A torsion is the same condition with the amount of twist 1 to 2 standard deviations greater. An example is when the angle of the femoral neck and greater than 15 degrees, the condition of femoral ante torsion exists (see photo above).

There are at least 3 reasons you need to understand about developmental torsions and versions that occur with growth:

  1. Since they occur in the transverse (horizontal) plane, they affect the progression angle of the foot and thus gait
  2. They affect available ranges of motion of a limb (ex the femur needs to internally rotate 4-6 degrees for normal gait) and can cause pain and/or gait alterations
  3. They can affect the coronal (frontal) plane orientation of the lower limb, which can affect gait and shoe choices. A Rothbart foot type with an elevated 1st metatarsal head will often result in a varus (or inverted) position of the forefoot with respect to the rear foot.

In this series, we will explore these 3 major versional changes, one at a time.

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So what do we see here?

a limp on the left?
a short leg on the right?
a weak gluteus medius on the left?
a shortened step length on the right?
increased arm swing on the left?

watch the push off (terminal stance/pre swing) on the right and then the left. Note how the left is weaker?
now watch the heel strike. Notice how it is shorter when the right strikes the ground than the left?
did you note the pelvic shift to the left on L stance phase? How about the subtle increased knee flexion on the left?

This gentleman has an atrophied gastroc/soleus on the left from an injury. He compensates by increasing thigh flexion on the left to clear the leg. Because he has lost gastroc/soleus strength on the left (the lateral gastrocis an important inverter of the heel after midstance and important component of rearfoot supination), the rearfoot everts more. allowing more midfoot pronation. This collapse of the midfoot brings his weight more medially, so he shifts his pelvis laterally (to the left) to keep his center of gravity over the foot.

Fix?

  • Make client aware of what is going on.
  • make sure gastroc/soleus complex strength and function is maximized through muscle work, acupuncture, muscle activation, functional gait exercise

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