How are your hammy’s?

Another tool for you, in addition to making sure the gluten are on line, to improve ankle rocker and hip extension.

“This study concludes that neural mobilization techniques are a useful adjunct to static stretching, without any risk of adverse events or injuries. Athletes or trainers can consider using one or both types of neural mobilization techniques to enhance muscular flexibility. Dosage of the neural mobilization as well as the proposed working mechanism behind the increase in hamstring flexibility can be found in the full text of the article.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26482098

Phys Ther Sport. 2016 Jan;17:30-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2015.03.003. Epub 2015 Mar 17.
Short term effectiveness of neural sliders and neural tensioners as an adjunct to static stretching of hamstrings on knee extension angle in healthy individuals: A randomized controlled trial.
Sharma S, Balthillaya G2, Rao R, Mani R .

Training out a crossover gait?

This gal came to see us with right-sided hamstring insertional pain. During gait analysis we noted that she has a crossover gait as seen in the first two sections of this video. In addition to making other changes both biomechanically (manipulation, gluteus medius exercises) and in her running style (“Rounding out her gait” and making her gait more “circular”, running with less impact on foot strike, extending her toes slightly in her shoes) she was told to run with her arms at her sides rather than across her body. You can see the results and the third part of this.

Because of her bilateral gluteus medius weakness that is seen with the dipping and lateral shift of the pelvis on the footstrike side, she moves her arms across her body to move her center of gravity over her feet.

Yes, there is much more work that needs to be done. This is one simple step in the entire process.

The Mighty Quadratus Femoris

Ishial tuberosity pain that looks like a hamstring but is not responding? Think QF.

We have always have found the quadratus femoris is one of, if not the, 1st hip muscle to become dysfunctional in hip pain patients. Perhaps it is due to it being the southern most stabilizer of the deep 6. Long known as an adductor, but also external rotator, we find it is employed eccentrically when the foot the planted and people rotate to the same side as weight bearing, or people take a “sudden stumble” while running. It often mimics an insertional hamstring strain with regards to location. We were happy to see it is getting some of the attention it deserves : )

The Mighty Quadratus Femoris

When is a hamstring strain not a hamstring strain?

We have always have found the quadratus femoris is one of, if not the, 1st hip muscle to become dysfunctional in hip pain patients. Perhaps it is due to it being the southern most stabilizer of the deep 6. Long known as an adductor, but also external rotator, we find it is employed eccentrically when the foot the planted and people rotate to the same side as weight bearing, or people take a “sudden stumble” while running. It often mimics an insertional hamstring strain with regards to location. We were happy to see it is getting some of the attention it deserves : )

http://www.anatomy-physiotherapy.com/articles/musculoskeletal/lower-extremity/hip/1528-function-of-the-quadratus-femoris-and-obturator-externus

A cause of ishial pain?

How many of us treat runners on a regular basis? Most of us I would say. While lecturing, I had an epiphany about recalcitrant hamstring insertional pain, that does seem to respond to conventional therapy. Take a look at the trigger point referral pattern for the semimembranosis/ semitendonosis. Note that in closed chain, these are external rotators of the thigh. Thinking about this, they would eccentrically contract (theoretically) to decelerate internal rotation of the thigh (such as with excessive midfoot pronation at initial contact and loading response.

Now look at when these guys fire during running gait. The left side of the graph (up to TO)  represents the stance phase of running gait (Mann 1986). The right side represents swing (or float) phase. Note that the medial hamstrings should fire from about foot descent to mid support (or midstance), with a little blast after the foot leaves the ground (asumed eccentrically) to assist in slowing the leg.

Now think about if the foot is a poor lever and remains on the ground just a little longer and rotates medially a little too far (overpronation); this muscle could conceivably be over worked and result in the trigger point referral pattern seen above on the ishial tuberosity.

Ah, but how to fix it? 

We could dry needle it and rehab it (better train it eccentrically, since that is how it is working), but it is already overworked, and in my cllinical experience, only provides temporary relief of the symptom. What other muscles seen in the chart could help? Hmmm… Take a look at the tibialis anterior (dorsiflexor/inverter), gastroc (medial) (plantarflexor/inverter), foot intrinsics and glute max/ posterior fibers of the glute medius. All external rotators (save for the foot intrinsics, which should fire from midstance to toe off) and a bonus pronatory decelerator for the tibialis anterior and able to slow an excessively internally rotating lower leg. You better check and make sure they are all on line before just treating the area of the chief complaint!

The Gait Guys. Keeping it real and giving you the tools to do a better job at what we all love to do : ) .

Hamstring Reverse Engineering:

The biceps femoris is an internal rotator of the thigh? You heard correctly. Think of how the lower extremity works in closed chain, not open. Check out this quick video with Dr Ivo on “reverse engineering”