Development of the arch: Functional implications | Lower Extremity Review Magazine

A nice, referenced piece from one of our fav’s, Dr Michaud.

“Although early research suggested a limited connection between arch height and lower extremity function, more recent research confirms that arch height does indeed affect function. Information obtained from measurements that accurately identify the height of the medial longitudinal arch may lead to more effective treatment protocols. By identifying specific injuries associated with low and high arches, it may also be possible to prevent these injuries.”

Development of the arch: Functional implications | Lower Extremity Review Magazine

Attempting to regain a level playing ground for your foot.

“Remember, we were born with both our rearfoot and forefoot designed to engage on the same plane (the flat ground). We were not born with the heel raised higher than the forefoot. And, the foot’s many anatomically congruent joint surfaces, their associated ligaments, the lines of tendon pull and all the large and small joint movements and orchestrations with each other are all predicated on this principle of a rearfoot and forefoot on the same plane. This is how our feet were designed from the start.  This is why I like shoes closer to zero drop, when possible, because I know that we are getting closer to enabling the anatomy as it was designed. This is not always possible, feasible, logical or reasonable depending on the problematic clinical presentation and there is plenty of research to challenge this thinking, yet plenty to support is as well. The question is, can you get back to this point after years of footwear compensating ? Or have your feet just changed too much, new acquired bony and joint changes that have too many miles on the new changes ? Perhaps you have spent your first 20-50 years in shoes with heeled shoes of varying heel-ball offset. Maybe you can get back to flat ground, maybe you cannot, but if you can, how long will it take? Months ? Years ?  It all makes sense to me, but does it make sense for your feet and your body biomechanics after all these years ? Time will tell.” -Dr. Allen

Fundamental foot skills everyone should have, subconsciously. This video shows a skill you must own for good foot mechanics. It needs to be present in standing, walking, squatting, jumping and the like. It is the normal baseline infrastructure that you must have every step, every moment of every day. 

Is your foot arch weak ? Still stuffing orthotics and stability shoes up under that falling infrastructure ? Try rebuilding a simple skill first, one that uses the intrinsic anatomy to  help pull the arch up.  If your foot is still flexible, you can likely re-earn much of the lost skills, such as this one. This is a fundamental first piece of our foot, lower limb and gait restoration program. We start here to be sure this skill is present, then add endurance work on it and then eventually strength and gait progressions. This is where it starts for us gang. 

Shawn and Ivo, the gait guys

Podcast 69: Advanced Arm Swing Concepts, Compensation Patterns and more

Plus: Foot Arch Pathomechanics, Knee Pivot Shift and Sesamoiditis and more !

A. Link to our server: 

http://traffic.libsyn.com/thegaitguys/pod_70ff.mp3

Direct Download: http://thegaitguys.libsyn.com/podcast-70

Permalink: 

B. iTunes link:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-gait-guys-podcast/id559864138

C. Gait Guys online /download store (National Shoe Fit Certification and more !) :

http://store.payloadz.com/results/results.aspx?m=80204

D. other web based Gait Guys lectures:

www.onlinece.com   type in Dr. Waerlop or Dr. Allen,  ”Biomechanics”

______________

Today’s Show notes:

1. “Compensation depends on the interplay of multiple factors: The availability of a compensatory response, the cost of compensation, and the stability of the system being perturbed.”
What happens when we change the length of one leg? How do we compensate? Here is a look at the short term consequences of a newly acquired leg length difference.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24857934
2. Medial Longitudinal Arch Mechanics Before and After a 45 Minute Run
http://www.japmaonline.org/doi/abs/10.7547/12-106.1

3. Several months ago we talked about the pivot-shift phenomenon. It is frequently missed clinically because it can be a tricky hands on assessment of the knee joint. In this article “ACL-deficient patients adopted the … .* Remember: what you see in their gait is not their problem, it is their strategy around their problem.
http://www.clinbiomech.com/article/S0268-0033(10)00264-0/abstract

4.Do you know the difference between a forefoot supinatus and a forefoot varus?
“A forefoot varus differs from forefoot supinatus in that a forefoot varus is a congenital osseous deformity that induces subtalar joint pronation, whereas forefoot supinatus is acquired and develops because of subtalar joint pronation. “
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24980930

5. Pubmed abstract link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24865637
Gait Posture. 2014 Jun;40(2):321-6. Epub 2014 May 6.
Arm swing in human walking: What is their drive?
Goudriaan M, Jonkers I, van Dieen JH, Bruijn SM

6. This is Your Brain On Guitar
http://www.the-open-mind.com/this-is-your-brain-on-guitar/

Podcast 69: Advanced Arm Swing Concepts, Compensation Patterns and more

Plus: Foot Arch Pathomechanics, Knee Pivot Shift and Sesamoiditis and more !

A. Link to our server: 

http://traffic.libsyn.com/thegaitguys/pod_70ff.mp3

Direct Download: http://thegaitguys.libsyn.com/podcast-70

Permalink: 

B. iTunes link:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-gait-guys-podcast/id559864138

C. Gait Guys online /download store (National Shoe Fit Certification and more !) :

http://store.payloadz.com/results/results.aspx?m=80204

D. other web based Gait Guys lectures:

www.onlinece.com   type in Dr. Waerlop or Dr. Allen,  ”Biomechanics”

______________

Today’s Show notes:

1. “Compensation depends on the interplay of multiple factors: The availability of a compensatory response, the cost of compensation, and the stability of the system being perturbed.”
What happens when we change the length of one leg? How do we compensate? Here is a look at the short term consequences of a newly acquired leg length difference.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24857934
2. Medial Longitudinal Arch Mechanics Before and After a 45 Minute Run
http://www.japmaonline.org/doi/abs/10.7547/12-106.1

3. Several months ago we talked about the pivot-shift phenomenon. It is frequently missed clinically because it can be a tricky hands on assessment of the knee joint. In this article “ACL-deficient patients adopted the … .* Remember: what you see in their gait is not their problem, it is their strategy around their problem.
http://www.clinbiomech.com/article/S0268-0033(10)00264-0/abstract

4.Do you know the difference between a forefoot supinatus and a forefoot varus?
“A forefoot varus differs from forefoot supinatus in that a forefoot varus is a congenital osseous deformity that induces subtalar joint pronation, whereas forefoot supinatus is acquired and develops because of subtalar joint pronation. “
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24980930

5. Pubmed abstract link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24865637
Gait Posture. 2014 Jun;40(2):321-6. Epub 2014 May 6.
Arm swing in human walking: What is their drive?
Goudriaan M, Jonkers I, van Dieen JH, Bruijn SM

6. This is Your Brain On Guitar
http://www.the-open-mind.com/this-is-your-brain-on-guitar/

Why alignment of the big toe is so critical to gait, posture, stabilization motor patterns and running.

There are two ways of thinking about the arch of the foot when it comes to competent height.  One perspective is to passively jack up the arch with a device such as an orthotic, a choice that we propose should always be your last option, or better yet to access the extrinsic and intrinsic muscles of the foot (as shown in this video) to compress the legs of the foot tripod and lift the arch dynamically.  Here today we DO NOT discuss the absolute critical second strategy of lifting the arch via the extensors as you have seen in our “tripod exercise video” (link here) but we assure you that regaining extensor skill is an absolute critical skill for normal arch integrity and function.  We like to say that there are two scenarios going on to regain a normal competent arch (and that does not necessarily mean a high arch, a low arch can also be competent….. it is about function and less about form): one scenario is to hydraulically lift the arch from below and the other scenario is to utilize a crane-like effect to lift the arch from above. When you combine the two, you restore the arch function.  In those with a flat flexible incompetent foot you can often regain normal alignment and function.  But remember, you have to get to the client before the deforming forces are significant enough and have been present long enough that the normal anatomical alignments are no longer possible. For example, a hallux valgus with a large bunion (this person will never get to the abductor hallucis sufficiently) or a progressively collapsed arch that is progressively becoming rigid or semi-rigid.

Think about these concepts today as you watch your clients walk, run or exercise.  And then consider this study below on the critical importance of the abductor hallucis muscle after watching our old video of Dr. Allen’s competent foot.  

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

The abductor hallucis muscle acts as a dynamic elevator of the arch. This muscle is often overlooked, poorly understood, and most certainly rarely addressed. Understanding this muscle and its mechanics may change the way we understand and treat pes planus, posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, hallux valgus, and many other issues that lead to a challenge of the arch, effective and efficient gait. Furthermore, its dysfunction and lead to many aberrant movement and stabilization strategies more proximally into the kinetic chains.

*From the article referenced below,  “Most studies of degenerative flatfoot have focused on the posterior tibial muscle, an extrinsic muscle of the foot. However, there is evidence that the intrinsic muscles, in particular the abductor hallucis (ABH), are active during late stance and toe-off phases of gait.”

We hope that this article, and the video above, will bring your focus back to the foot and to gait for when the foot and gait are aberrant most proximal dynamic stabilization patterns of the body are merely strategic compensations.

Study RESULTS:

All eight specimens showed an origin from the posteromedial calcaneus and an insertion at the tibial sesamoid. All specimens also demonstrated a fascial sling in the hindfoot, lifting the abductor hallucis muscle to give it an inverted ‘V’ shaped configuration. Simulated contraction of the abductor hallucis muscle caused flexion and supination of the first metatarsal, inversion of the calcaneus, and external rotation of the tibia, consistent with elevation of the arch.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17559771

Foot Ankle Int. 2007 May;28(5):617-20.

Influence of the abductor hallucis muscle on the medial arch of the foot: a kinematic and anatomical cadaver study.

Wong YS. Island Sports Medicine & Surgery, Island Orthopaedic Group, #02-16 Gleneagles Medical Centre, 6 Napier Road, Singapore, 258499, Singapore. 

In this great little slow mo video we see some things. Do you ? … The Perfect Runner.

1. First clips….. awesome toe extension through the entire swing phase all the way into early contact phase.  You have read here before on our blog entries how critical toe extension is for stable and optimal arch contruction prior to foot loading. Suboptimal arch height can mean that pronation loading occurs in a suboptimal foot tripod posturing and can mean difficulties controlling the normal end point where pronation should stop and convert back into supination to ensure rigid toe off.  (It is kind of like two runners in a 100m sprint. One starts at the line off the blocks and the other gets to start 1 second earlier 10 meters back from the line and gain speed towards the line before the gun goes off.  This is what it is like to start pronation prematurely, or with a suboptimal arch, the starting line where things are fair to all parts has been moved. The foot (the other guy in the race) doesnt have a chance.  Maybe a bad example but you catch the drift we’re surfin’ here.)  Back to our point, Niobe has great running form and great technicals.  Great midfoot strike, yes a little forefoot here but that is what happens when you are barefoot naked on hard surfaces. You have to get good form before you can clean up the technicals.  We spend alot of time on the technicals of running once form is clean. It is what makes the difference between 2nd place and a winner. And it is these little things that mushroom into nagging injuries over time.  We cannot express enough how important toe extension range and strength is for proper foot function and a strong neutral foot tripod.  We rarely have to address long toe flexor strength, short flexor strength yes, but not long.  Toe curls, towel scrunches, picking up stuff is not on our list of homework.

2. Second clip. He is skirting the issue of cross over without going too far. He could do a bit better but all in all pretty decent.

3. Emmanual Pairs, big dude ! No cross over. Awesome form.

4. Krysha Bailey. Long jumper. As with all sprinters, no cross over, beautiful form.

Just some easy topics and viewing for a Saturday blog post.

Have a good day brethren !

Shawn and Ivo