Ahh yes, the lumbricals. 

One of our favorite muscles. And here it is in a recent paper! This one is for all you fellow foot geeks : )

Perhaps the FDL (which fires slightly earlier than the FHL) and FHL (which fires slightly later and longer) at loading response, slowing pronation and setting the stage for lumbrical function from midstance to terminal stance/preswing (flexion at the metatarsal phalangeal joint (it would have to be eccentric, if you think about this from a closed chain perspective) and extension (actually compression) of the proximal interphalangeal joints.

“The first lumbrical arose as two muscle bellies from both the tendon of the FDL and the tendinous slip of the FHL in 83.3 %, and as one muscle belly from the tendon of the FDL or the tendinous slip of the FHL in 16.7 %. These two muscle bellies subsequently merged to form the muscle belly of the first lumbrical. The second lumbrical arose from the tendinous slips of the FHL for the second and third toes as well as the tendon of the FDL in all specimens. The third lumbrical arose from the tendinous slips of the FHL for the third and fourth toes in 69.7 %, and the fourth lumbrical arose from the tendinous slip of the FHL for the fourth toe in 18.2 %. Some deep muscle fibers of the fourth lumbrical arose from the tendinous slip of the FHL for the second toe in 4.5 %, for the third toe in 28.8 %, and for the fourth toe in 15.2 %.”

Hur MS1, Kim JH, Gil YC, Kim HJ, Lee KS. New insights into the origin of the lumbrical muscles of the foot: tendinous slip of the flexor hallucis longus muscle. Surg Radiol Anat. 2015 May 12. [Epub ahead of print]

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